Shattering the silence on sexual harassment & assault: Lisa Senecal breaks her NDA & tells her #MeToo story

Lisa Senecal had a choice: the entrepreneur in Stowe, Vermont, could abide by her nondisclosure agreement (NDA) and remain silent about the sexual harassment and assault that she says she experienced while applying for a job at Inntopia, a national business based in Stowe. Or she could speak out about Craig DeLuca, the former Inntopia president who she accuses of preying on vulnerable women, including one who recently filed a lawsuit against DeLuca and Inntopia. Senecal has decided to speak out. On June 2, 2018, she wrote an article for The Daily Beast: “The NDA Protected Our Predator. I’m Breaking My Silence, Because Women Deserve Better.”  Senecal is a communications and marketing entrepreneur and cofounder of The Maren Group, which focuses on serving people experiencing discrimination in the workplace and higher education. She is a commissioner on the Vermont Commission on Women. Senecal hopes that by telling her story, other women will be empowered to tell theirs. (June 6, 2018 broadcast)

Lisa Senecal, co-founder, The Maren Group, author, “The NDA Protected Our Predator. I’m Breaking My Silence, Because Women Deserve Better.” 

Rep. Sarah Copeland-Hanzas: Transforming activism into law on sexual harassment & gun safety

The Vt Commission on Women reports that 60 percent of women say they’ve experienced sexual harassment at work, and most of those say they have experienced retaliation for speaking up about it. Rep. Sarah Copeland-Hanzas (D-Bradford) is lead sponsor of a bill to change Vermont’s sexual harassment laws to ban non-disclosure agreements and protect victims’ rights. She says that the #MeToo movement inspired the legislation in Vermont. She has also advanced legislation that would put a price on carbon, and discusses the need to keep up the pressure for new gun safety laws. Copeland-Hanzas was first elected to the Vermont House of Representatives in 2004 and is the former House majority leader. (February 28, 2018 broadcast)

Vermont Rep. Sarah Copeland-Hanzas

Trailblazers: Vt Sen. Becca Balint & Rep. Kiah Morris on #MeToo, activism and politics

Vermont Sen. Becca Balint and Rep. Kiah Morris are political trailblazers. Balint, the Senate Majority Leader, is one of the first women to be elected to Senate leadership and the highest ranking openly gay legislator in the state. Morris is just the second African American woman to serve in the Vermont legislature. In separate interviews, the two leaders talk about the “sea change” for women in politics in the wake of the #MeToo movement against sexual harassment, how they mix activism, advocacy and politics, and their personal journeys into politics. (January 3, 2018)

Vt. Senator Becca Balint, Windham County, Senate Majority Leader

 

Vt. Rep. Kiah Morris, Bennington

Don’t cry for the fallen: Madhulika Sikka on downfall of once-mighty media men

Matt Lauer of NBC, Charlie Rose, of PBS and CBS, Bill O’Reilly of Fox News, John Hockenberry of NPR – all of these powerful men of the media have one thing in common: they no longer have a microphone due to sexual harassment allegations. Are these men getting their just due, or being denied due process and unfairly punished? For answers, we turned to Madhulika Sikka, the public editor of PBS, where serves as an independent internal critic of the network. Prior to joining PBS, she was the award-winning executive producer of NPR’s Morning Edition, executive editor of NPR News, and worked at ABC News Nightline with Ted Koppel for 13 years. Sikka recently argued in an article in The Daily Beast: “Stop lamenting the ‘loss of talent’ of the men who have been removed. If we examine the lost opportunities of so many women as a result of the structural obstacles to their growth, advancement, and power, that work could fill up all our time.” Sikka discusses the fall of the media’s mighty men, her book about dealing with breast cancer, and her latest project, 52 weeks 52 books 52 women, a website and podcast. (December 13, 2017 broadcast)

Madhulika Sikka, Public Editor, PBS

#MeToo: Women fight back against sexual harassment and assault

The #MeToo campaign, in which women are taking to social media to share their experiences with sexual harassment and assault, has shined a bright light on what women deal with daily at work and in public. This campaign has been energized by revelations about how Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein routinely sexually assaulted, touched and humiliated countless women. Two experts discuss what sexual harassment is, their personal and professional experiences with it, and how women can fight back. (October 18, 2017 broadcast)

Cathleen Barkley, Executive Director, HOPE Works, Burlington, VT

Sarah Robinson, Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence